Drake In Detail

On May 28 and 29, 1586, Sir Francis Drake attacked St. Augustine.

Drake’s raid was part of a larger expedition led by the English privateer against Spanish settlements in the Caribbean. An Italian cartographer named Baptista Boazio created this map in order to illustrate Drake’s successful campaign. Boazio’s hand-colored map is the earliest known depiction of a European settlement in what is now the United States; it is also the oldest item in the collections of the State Archives of Florida.

Map of Drake's raid on St. Augustine, by Baptista Boazio, published in 1589

Map of Drake’s raid on St. Augustine, by Baptista Boazio, published in 1589

Boazio, who never visited St. Augustine, included fine details in his map derived from first-hand accounts of English exploits. Join us as we take a look at Drake in detail.

Detail of a galleon, the largest of the 43 vessels portrayed by Boazio

Detail of a galleon, the largest of the 43 vessels portrayed by Boazio


 

Detail of the wooden fort: "The fort which the Spaniards had made of the bodies of Cedar trees, they placed therein some fourteen great and long pieces of artillery, which at our arrival there to the sand bank played upon us, the forte was called Saint John de Pinos which afterward we burned."

Detail of the wooden fort: “The fort which the Spaniards had made of the bodies of Cedar trees, they placed therein some fourteen great and long pieces of artillery, which at our arrival there to the sand bank played upon us, the forte was called Saint John de Pinos which afterward we burned.”

 

Detail of a Dolphin, or Mahi-mahi: "The lively portraiture of a fish called the Dolphin, which is of three feuerall colours: the top of his back and all his fins be blue, all his sides are of light green, the belly white, his head almost all blue, the tail one part blue, and the lower part green, he is very pleasant to behold in the sea by day light, and in the night he seemeth to be of the colour of gold, he takes pleasure as other fishes do in swimming by the ship, he is excellent sweet to be eaten, this fish lives most by chasing of the flying fish and other small fishes, they are caught most commonly by our mariners with harping irons or fisgigs (fishgigs?)."

Detail of a Dolphin, or Mahi-mahi: “The lively portraiture of a fish called the Dolphin, which is of three feuerall colours: the top of his back and all his fins be blue, all his sides are of light green, the belly white, his head almost all blue, the tail one part blue, and the lower part green, he is very pleasant to behold in the sea by day light, and in the night he seemeth to be of the colour of gold, he takes pleasure as other fishes do in swimming by the ship, he is excellent sweet to be eaten, this fish lives most by chasing of the flying fish and other small fishes, they are caught most commonly by our mariners with harping irons or fisgigs (fishgigs?).”

 

Detail of soldiers attacking the walled city and surrounding fields

Detail of soldiers attacking the walled city and surrounding fields

 

Detail of homes, fields, sand dunes, and a wild boar on Anastasia Island

Detail of homes, fields, sand dunes, and a wild boar on Anastasia Island

 

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