Historic Jacksonville Hotels

These photographs represent some of the hotels built in Jacksonville between the 1880s and 1940s. Before and after the Civil War, the earliest travelers to the east coast of Florida came to Jacksonville via steamship. The more intrepid visitors used Jacksonville as a base for exploring the chain of lakes that make up the St. Johns River.

Grandview Hotel, 1880s

Grandview Hotel, 1880s

Flagler and Plant’s railroads brought the next wave of tourists to Jacksonville in the late 1800s. They stopped at the riverfront city for a night or two before venturing onward to the luxurious resorts in Tampa, St. Petersburg, Palm Beach, and Miami.

Grand National Hotel, 1890s

Grand National Hotel, 1890s

 

Windsor Hotel, 1903

Windsor Hotel, 1903

By the early 20th century, automobiles and improved roads made travel to Florida easier. Tourists poured into the Sunshine State by the carload.

Duval Hotel, 1912

Duval Hotel, 1912

 

Hotel Roosevelt lobby, ca. 1925

Hotel Roosevelt lobby, ca. 1925

The Great Jacksonville Fire of 1901 destroyed many buildings downtown, including a number of hotels. Jacksonvillians rebuilt their city and constructed new hotels to entice travelers. The photographs below, from the 1930s and 1940s, represent the final golden age of hotels in downtown Jacksonville before redevelopment altered much of the city following World War II.

Hotel Seminole, 1933

Hotel Seminole, 1933

 

Hotel Mason, 1935

Hotel Mason, 1935

 

Andrew Jackson Hotel, 1936

Andrew Jackson Hotel, 1936

 

"Finest Roof Garden in the South," Mayflower Hotel, 1937

“Finest Roof Garden in the South,” Mayflower Hotel, 1937

 

Hotel Albert, ca. 1930

Hotel Albert, ca. 1930

 

Veranda at the Continental Hotel, Atlantic Beach, ca. 1940

Veranda at the Continental Hotel, Atlantic Beach, ca. 1940

 

Hotel Flagler, 1941

Hotel Flagler, 1941

 

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