International Coffee Day

September 29th is International Coffee Day! Check out these photos while you enjoy your favorite cup of joe.

Woman enjoying a cup of coffee at Lovett's Food Store, Jacksonville, 1946

Woman enjoying a cup of coffee at Lovett’s Food Store, Jacksonville, 1946

 

Fisherman pouring himself a cup of coffee below deck, Naples, 1949

Fisherman pouring himself a cup of coffee below deck, Naples, 1949

 

Tour guide George Espenlaub making "swamp coffee" in the Everglades, 1950s

Tour guide George Espenlaub making “swamp coffee” in the Everglades, 1950s

 

Maxwell House coffee quality control, Jacksonville, 1950s

Maxwell House coffee quality control, Jacksonville, 1950s

 

Evelyn Horne serving coffee to Billie Parks and Tessie Siegfried at the Riverview Inn restaurant, Estero, ca. 1955

Evelyn Horne serving coffee to Billie Parks and Tessie Siegfried at the Riverview Inn restaurant, Estero, ca. 1955

 

Employee pouring coffee beans into a grinder at the "Oldest Store," St. Augustine, 1964

Employee pouring coffee beans into a grinder at the “Oldest Store,” St. Augustine, 1964

 

American Indian Day

Florida Governor Rick Scott has proclaimed September 27, 2013 American Indian Day.

Addie Billie, Ochopee, 1989

Addie Billie, Ochopee, 1989

Visit Florida Memory to find resources on Native Americans in Florida history.

Online Classroom, The Florida Seminoles

Significant Documents, Land Grant from the Upper Creeks, Lower Creeks and Seminoles to Thomas Brown (March 1, 1783)

Video, “Scenes of the Everglades,” by Homer Augustus Brinkley (1928)

Collections, Theodor de Bry’s 16th Century Engravings of the Timucua Indians

Audio, Interview with Richard Bowers, Seminole Alligator Wrestler

Audio, “Seminole,” written by Will McLean and performed by James Billie (listen below)

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Audio, “Big Alligator,” by James E. Billie (listen below)

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The items above represent a small sample of resources on Native American history available from the State Library and Archives of Florida.

Jibaro Puertorriqueño

Florida is home to immigrants from across Latin America and the Caribbean. In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15-October 15), this series of blog posts features music brought to Florida from throughout the Hispanic world.

Today we’re highlighting Puerto Rican jibaro music. The term jibaro originally referred to Puerto Ricans from the interior mountainous regions of the country. Overtime jibaro became more of a general term for the rural population of Puerto Rico.

Jorge Lopez and Lena Verde performing at the Historical Museum of Southern Florida during the Traditions Festival, Miami, 1986

Jorge Lopez and Lena Verde performing at the Historical Museum of Southern Florida during the Traditions Festival, Miami, 1986

In 1986, Jorge Lopez and the band Lena Verde (Angelo Hernandez, Alejandro Santiago, and Angelo Rosario) performed this traditional style of Puerto Rican music at the first annual South Florida Folk Festival.

La Plena

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More Information: Catalog Record

Live Chat with a Professional Librarian

Florida Memory now has a professional librarian living on our Resources for the 2014 Florida History Fair page! Students, teachers, and anyone with a research question are encouraged to drop by.

Try it now!


Sample questions:

  • Can you help me find good examples of how to write essays?
  • I am looking for a website about grammar, for example, conjunctions, verbs, etc.
  • Where do I go for census statistics?

Ask a Librarian is a free online service that allows Florida residents to chat or text with a librarian.

Sunday – Thursday: 10am until midnight ET
Friday – Saturday: 10am until 5pm ET

Get your own Ask a Librarian widget or app.

Special Events at the John G. Riley Museum

In about 1890, John Gilmore Riley (1857-1954) built a family home near the Smokey Hollow neighborhood in Tallahassee. That structure, preserved and rehabilitated beginning in the 1970s through the hard work of several community organizations, is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places and home to the John G. Riley Museum.

John G. Riley, Tallahassee, ca. 1890

John G. Riley, Tallahassee, ca. 1890

Riley served as an educator for nearly 50 years, and as a leader in the African American community throughout his entire life. He took his first teaching job in Wakulla County in 1877 and later became principal of Lincoln Academy.

John G. Riley and Lincoln Academy students, Tallahassee, ca. 1900

John G. Riley and Lincoln Academy students, Tallahassee, ca. 1900

This week, the John G. Riley Museum opens a new visitor center to the public. Special events throughout the week (September 24 – September 28) celebrate the life and legacy of John G. Riley and the history of the Smokey Hollow community.

Lesser Known Florida Hurricanes: Jupiter Inlet (1696)

The Atlantic hurricane season is once again upon us. It’s time for preparation… and a little history.

Some of the most famous storms in the annals of hurricane history made landfall in Florida. The Sunshine State is certainly not alone in suffering from tropical weather; Hugo, Gilbert, Katrina, Mitch, and Sandy immediately come to mind.

We remember the devastation from Andrew, Charley, Donna, Jeanne, Francis and many others, but what about the lesser known hurricanes in Florida history? This series of blog posts takes a look back at lesser known hurricanes and other tidbits concerning tropical weather in Florida history.

Today, we take a look back at the Jupiter Inlet Hurricane of 1696 as described by Jonathan Dickinson.

Excerpt from "Insulae Americanae in Oceano Septentrionali ac Regiones Adiacentes..." by Nicolaes Visscher (1680)

Excerpt from “Insulae Americanae in Oceano Septentrionali ac Regiones Adiacentes…” by Nicolaes Visscher (1680)

On September 23, 1696, a hurricane of unknown strength impacted South Florida. Jonathan Dickinson, a Quaker merchant, and several of his traveling companions aboard the bark Reformation fell victim to the high seas whipped up by the storm. Tossed and battered by persistent wind and waves, the Reformation wrecked on a sandbar near what is today known as Jupiter Inlet. Dickinson survived the ordeal and wrote a journal about his experience. Below is an excerpt from his account describing the hurricane and subsequent shipwreck:

“About one o’clock in the morning we felt our vessel strike some few stokes, and then she floated again for five of six minutes before she ran fast aground, where she beat violently at first. The wind was so violent and it was very dark, that our mariners could see no land; the seas broke over us that we were in a quarter of an hour floating in the cabin: we endeavored to get a candle lighted, which in a little time was accomplished.

“By this time we felt the vessel not to strike so often but several of her timbers were broken and some plank started. The seas continued breaking over us and no land to be seen; we concluded to keep in the vessel as long as she would hold together. About the third hour this morning we supposed we saw land at some considerable distance, and at this time we found the water began to run out of the vessel.

“And at daylight we perceived we were upon the shore, on a beach lying in the breach of the sea which at times as the surges of the sea reversed was dry. In taking a view of our vessel, we found that the violence of the weather had forced many sorts of seabirds on board our vessel, some of which were by force of the wind blown into and under our hen-cubs and many remained alive. Our hogs and sheep were washed away and swam on shore, except one of the hogs which remained in the vessel.

“We rejoiced at this our preservation from the raging sea; but at the same instant feared the sad consequences that followed: yet having hopes still we got our sick and lame on shore, also our provisions, with spars and sails to make a tent.”

The party encountered local Native Americans known as the Jaega soon after reaching dry land. Over the next two months the survivors endured an arduous journey along the Florida coast. In early October they were captured by the Santa Luces, a band of Ais Indians who lived in modern-day St. Lucie and Indian River counties. Dickinson’s descriptions of Jaega and Ais ceremonies are similar to other captivity narratives and offer tremendous insight into the customs and rituals of indigenous Floridians.

"The Florida Indians Capture the Shipwrecked Company," from Pieter van der Aa, Naaukeuirge Versameling der Gedenk-waardigste Zee en Landreysen na Oost en West-Indien (1707)

“The Florida Indians Capture the Shipwrecked Company,” from Pieter van der Aa, Naaukeuirge Versameling der Gedenk-waardigste Zee en Landreysen na Oost en West-Indien (1707)

Eventually, the tired and weary travelers were escorted to St. Augustine. There, the Spaniards arranged for passage to Charleston (then known as Charles Town) and thence to Philadelphia, their original destination. As suggested by the title of Dickinson’s journal, he attributed their survival to “God’s Protecting Providence.”

To learn more, see Evangeline Walker Andrews and Charles McLean Andrews, eds., Jonathan Dickinson’s Journal, Or God’s Protecting Providence… (Yale University Press, 1945).

Fall into Fall in Florida

Happy Fall! We’d like to take a moment to remind you why Florida is so wonderful this time of year…

Up North, the leaves are turning brown, but in Florida…

Sanibel Island, ca. 1980

Sanibel Island, ca. 1980

Coconut palm on Hutchinson Island, 1992

Coconut palm on Hutchinson Island, 1992

Up North, the skies are turning gray, but in Florida…

Everglades City, ca. 1990

Everglades City, ca. 1990

Key West, 1979

Key West, 1979

Up North, people are airing out their sweaters and scarves, but in Florida…

Young women at the beach, ca. 1950

Young women at the beach, ca. 1950

Young women running on the beach, Pensacola, 1969

Young women running on the beach, Pensacola, 1969

Cocoa Beach, ca. 1990

Cocoa Beach, ca. 1990

Because in Florida there’s always… Year ‘Round Bathing!

Florida-themed postcard, postmarked 1945

Florida-themed postcard, postmarked 1945

Up North, folks are eagerly awaiting the start of ski season. In Florida, our ski season lasts all year…

Skiing down a sand hill, Fort Meade, 1951

Skiing down a sand hill, Fort Meade, 1951

Water skiers perform at Cypress Gardens, Winter Haven, 1955

Water skiers perform at Cypress Gardens, Winter Haven, 1955

And while our friends up North are warming their bones next to the fireplace, we like to have bonfires… on the beach.

Bonfire at the beach, ca. 1960

Bonfire at the beach, ca. 1960

So, this fall, just remember: when you need it bad, we’ve got it good!

See the full-length film.

Florida and the Civil War (September 1863)

Lost Victory: The Battle of Chickamauga and the Floridians Who Fought There

The Battle of Chickamauga (September 19-20, 1863) was the last major Confederate victory of the Civil War. It was also one of the bloodiest: the Confederates suffered 18,000 casualties and the Federals 16,000. The battle was the second largest battle of the war, only Gettysburg was larger.

Chickamauga was also important for Florida. All six of Florida’s regiments in the war’s western theater (the territory between the Appalachian Mountains and the Mississippi River) were engaged in the battle. As a result of their fighting at Chickamauga, General Braxton Bragg, commander of the Confederate Army of Tennessee, created the “Florida Brigade of the West” by combining the Florida regiments into one formation.

Corporal Seaborn Tiller of the 6th Florida Infantry Regiment, 1862

Corporal Seaborn Tiller of the 6th Florida Infantry Regiment, 1862

Read more »

Lesser Known Florida Hurricanes: Pensacola Bay (1559)

The Atlantic hurricane season is once again upon us. It’s time for preparation… and a little history.

Some of the most famous storms in the annals of hurricane history made landfall in Florida. The Sunshine State is certainly not alone in suffering from tropical weather; Hugo, Gilbert, Katrina, Mitch, and Sandy immediately come to mind.

We remember the devastation from Andrew, Charley, Donna, Jeanne, Francis and many others, but what about the lesser known hurricanes in Florida history? This series of blog posts takes a look back at lesser known hurricanes and other tidbits concerning tropical weather in Florida history.

Today, we look back at the storm that derailed Spanish attempts to establish a colony at Pensacola Bay in 1559.

"Plan de la Baye de Pansacola" by Jacques Nicolas Bellin (1744)

“Plan de la Baye de Pansacola” by Jacques Nicolas Bellin (1744)

On June 11, 1559, 1,500 colonists and soldiers under the command of Tristán de Luna y Arellano (1519–1571) left Mexico bound for the northern Gulf coast. They intended to establish a colony at one of the sheltered harbors along the coast and use the settlement as a base of operations for expanding Spain’s reach into the interior southeast.

On September 19, just five days after arriving at Pensacola Bay, a violent hurricane pounded the nascent settlement. De Luna later wrote to the King of Spain about the storm:

“…there came up from the north a fierce tempest, which, blowing for twenty-four hours from all directions…without stopping but increasingly continuously, did irreparable damage to the ships of the fleet…great loss by seamen and passengers, both of their lives as well as of their property. All the ships which were in this port went aground (although it is one of the best ports there are in these Indies), save only one caravel and two barks, which escaped. This has reduced us to such extremity that unless I provide soon for the need in which it left us…I do not know how I can maintain the people…”

Following the storm, de Luna sent a portion of the settlers and soldiers inland in search of provisions. Ultimately, their efforts to extort crops from Native American tribes failed and the project was abandoned within two years of de Luna’s initial landing at Pensacola Bay. The Spanish would not return to the area until 1698, when they reestablished a settlement that persists today as the American city of Pensacola.

To learn more, see Herbert Ingram Priestley, The Luna Papers, 1559-1561 (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2010); Roger C. Smith et al., The Emanuel Point Ship: Archaeological Investigations, 1992-1995, Preliminary Report (Tallahassee: Division of Historical Resources, Bureau of Archaeological Research, 1995); Roger C. Smith et al., The Emanuel Point Ship: Archaeological Investigations, 1997-1998 (Pensacola: University of West Florida, 1998). Copies of documents related to the failed colony are available at the State Archives of Florida, Tallahassee, in Series 1632: Historic Pensacola Preservation Board, Don Tristán de Luna y Arellano.
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Florida Net Maker: The Strangest Catch

Every year, staff at the State Archives of Florida gets ready for the Florida History Fair by searching out primary source documents and compiling a list of resources for students and teachers. One of this year’s suggested Florida-related topics is “Commercial Fishing Net Ban: Economics, Ecology, and Responsibility.” That topic led us to this story.

In 1980, folklorist Peggy Bulger interviewed net maker Billy Burbank III as part of her research on the fishing industry in Florida. Burbank told Bulger the tale of a fishing boat that accidentally caught something very strange in its trawl nets.

Burbank family at Burbank Trawl Makers, Inc., Fernandina Beach, 1986

Burbank family at Burbank Trawl Makers, Inc., Fernandina Beach, 1986

Billy Burbank and the Strangest Catch

B: My name is Billy Burbank, III. I was born in Fernandina Beach, Florida, October 2, 1951.

P: Now tell me something about your grandfather, William Burbank.

B: Well, my grandfather was born on Cumberland Island which is in Georgia. He started shrimping oh back in his early years when he was 15-16 years old. He got into the shrimp business, oh just starting shrimping and started making his own nets.

And when oh his nets seemed to out produce everybody else’s nets. Then everybody decided to get him to make their nets and then that’s when we got started in the net business in about 1915 and been in it ever since.

P: […] Oh, what is the strangest catch you’ve ever heard anybody catching around here?

B: Strangest catch?

P: Yeah.

B: […] Probably be oh, submarines. An actual submarine in someone’s net started towing the boat backwards almost sinking the boat didn’t even realize they had the shrimp boat caught. It was the— not a Navy submarine. It was a German, I mean a Russian submarine.

P: Here?

B: Well, it was off this coast, yeah. They didn’t even realize that they had the submarine in the net at first. They were towed one way and all of a sudden started going backwards of the cable popped. And just a little while later they saw the submarine surface with the shrimp net on top of ‘em. I guess I’d have to say that is the weirdest catch.

Learn More About Net Making

Burbank nets have been used by people in the U.S. from North Carolina down to Florida and up the Gulf Coast through the Texas Panhandle area. Their nets have also been exported to Central and South America and Africa. At the time of the interview, Burbank Trawl Makers was the largest producer of fishing nets in the United States.

In the interview, Burbank also describes the different net types and uses – including flat nets, four seam balloon nets, two seam balloon nets, and a modification that Billy Burbank III developed called the Mongoose, which is actually two nets in one.

Read the full interview in Netmaking and Net Fishing in Florida.

Close-up view of net made by Billy Burbank III, Fernandina Beach, 1980

Close-up view of net made by Billy Burbank III, Fernandina Beach, 1980