Twine Photographic Collection

In commemoration of Black History Month, this series of blog posts highlights African-American history in Florida.

Richard Aloysius Twine (1896-1974) photographed the African-American community of Lincolnville, just south of St. Augustine, in the 1920s.

Richard A. Twine, ca. 1925

Richard A. Twine, ca. 1925

Twine, born in St. Augustine on May 11, 1896, had a brief but notable career as a professional photographer in Lincolnville. Founded by freed slaves after the Civil War, Lincolnville’s homes and businesses formed the center of St. Augustine’s black community in the early 20th century.

Emancipation Day Parade, ca. 1925

Emancipation Day Parade, ca. 1925

The Twine home on Kings Ferry Way was damaged by fire and about to be torn down in 1988 when, fortuitously, the demolition crew discovered 103 glass-plate negatives in the attic. The negatives were restored and placed in the custody of the St. Augustine Historical Society. A partnership in the 1990s allowed the Archives to copy Twine’s negatives, and later, make them available on the Florida Memory website.

Demps family outside their home, ca. 1925

Demps family outside their home, ca. 1925

Lincolnville residents played a critical role in the local Civil Rights Movement, particularly as foot soldiers in the sit-ins, wade-ins, and other demonstrations held in the early 1960s. Today, the remaining historic buildings in Lincolnville are part of the Lincolnville Historic District.

Knights of St. Johns, ca. 1925

Knights of St. Johns, ca. 1925

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