Peruvian Waltz

Florida is home to immigrants from across Latin America and the Caribbean. In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15-October 15), this series of blog posts features music brought to Florida from throughout the Hispanic world.

We are highlighting the Peruvian waltz for our final blog post in the series celebrating Hispanic Heritage Month. The waltz is a style of musica criolla, which originated in coastal Peru. Its roots come from a combination of traditional Spanish, Romani, and African music.

Hilda Gonzalez, Miami, 1985

Hilda Gonzalez, Miami, 1985

In 1986, Florida folklorists conducted the Dade Folk Arts Survey in order to identify folk artists for the 34th Annual Florida Folk Festival. During the course of the survey, a Latin American trio of musicians (Nelson Zuleto, Hilda Gonzalez, and Manolo Franco) performed the Peruvian waltz Alma, Corazon, y Vida (Soul, Heart, and Life).

Nelson Zuleto, Miami, 1985

Nelson Zuleto, Miami, 1985

Enjoy!

Peruvian Waltz, by Nelson Zuleto, Hilda Gonzalez, and Manolo Franco

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download: MP3

More Information: Catalog Record

Tallahassee Democrat Collection

The Tallahassee Democrat Collection contains photographic negatives taken by Tallahassee Democrat photographers from the 1950s to 1970.

Three unidentified African American servicemen posing with a woman in Tallahassee (ca. 1955)

 

Two unidentified cigarette girls in Tallahassee (1956)

 

FSU football players in Tallahassee (1957)

FSU football players in Tallahassee (1957)

 

FSU freshmen sitting in front of William James Bryan Hall in Tallahassee (1953)

FSU freshmen sitting in front of William James Bryan Hall in Tallahassee (1953)

 

Dorian Stripling getting his first haircut in Tallahassee (1957)

Dorian Stripling getting his first haircut in Tallahassee (1957)

 

Governor LeRoy Collins monitoring Democratic primary election results with supporters in Tallahassee (1956)

Governor LeRoy Collins monitoring Democratic primary election results with supporters in Tallahassee (1956)

 

Unidentified African American football players in Tallahassee (1953)

Unidentified African American football players in Tallahassee (1953)

Join us tonight, October 11, from 6:00 to 8:00 PM for a slideshow event featuring images from the Tallahassee Democrat Collection.

Salsa Express

Florida is home to immigrants from across Latin America and the Caribbean. In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15-October 15), this series of blog posts features music brought to Florida from throughout the Hispanic world.

Cubans made their mark on Florida long before it became part of the United States. In recent years, Cuban immigrants have played a major role in shaping Florida’s politics, economy, and cultural landscape. Cuban musical traditions are some of the most vivid and recognizable expressions of Cubanidad imported from the island to the mainland.

Salsa music, which originated in Cuba, became internationally popular in the 1970s with its ability to pack the dance floor. Salsa was influenced by many different styles of music but its core structure comes from Son Cubano, which features a mixture of Spanish and African elements.

Salsa Express, Miami, ca. 1980

Salsa Express, Miami, ca. 1980

In October 1981, as part of the Cuban American Slide and Tape Project, Florida folklorists recorded a performance by Salsa Express at the Latin Fiesta Club in Miami (pictured below).

Latin Fiesta Club, Miami, 1981

Latin Fiesta Club, Miami, 1981

Enjoy!

Salsa Express performing at the Latin Fiesta Club

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download: MP3

More Information: Catalog Record

Learn more about the Cuban Experience in Florida

Tallahassee-Leon County Civil Rights Heritage Walk

Earlier this week, the City of Tallahassee unveiled a commemorative sidewalk that recognizes the pivotal role played by Tallahassee and Leon County residents in the Civil Rights Movement.

The artistic sidewalk, located at the intersection of Monroe and Jefferson Streets in downtown Tallahassee, is appropriately placed near the site of many dramatic moments during the struggle for civil rights in Florida’s capital city.

The photographs below captured some of those events and the daring individuals who challenged segregation and changed history.

Reverend C. K. Steele (left) and Reverend Daniel Speed protesting segregated seating on city buses, December 24, 1956

Reverend C. K. Steele (left) and Reverend Daniel Speed protesting segregated seating on city buses, December 24, 1956

 

Northeast corner of Adams and Jefferson Streets during the McCrory's and Woolworth's sit-ins, March 12, 1960

Northeast corner of Adams and Jefferson Streets during the McCrory’s and Woolworth’s sit-ins, March 12, 1960

 

FAMU students protesting the arrest of sit-in participants, March 12, 1960

FAMU students protesting the arrest of sit-in participants, March 12, 1960

 

Sit-in at Woolworth's lunch counter, March 13, 1960

Sit-in at Woolworth’s lunch counter, March 13, 1960

 

Demonstrators outside of a segregated theater, 1962

Demonstrators outside of a segregated theater, 1962

 

Demonstrators outside of a segregated theater, 1962

Demonstrators outside of a segregated theater, 1962

 

Demonstration in front of a segregated theater, 1963

Demonstration in front of a segregated theater, 1963

 

FAMU students arrested for protesting at segregated theaters, March 31, 1963

FAMU students arrested for protesting at segregated theaters, March 31, 1963

These eight photographs tell only a small part of the story. To learn more, see The Civil Rights Movement in Florida (online learning unit); Tananarive Due and Patricia Stephens Due, Freedom in the Family: A Mother-Daughter Memoir of the Fight for Civil Rights (New York: Ballantine Books, 2003); Glenda Alice Rabby, The Pain and the Promise, The Struggle for Civil Rights in Tallahassee, Florida (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1999).

The Archives on the Radio!

Everything you wanted to know about the Archives and Florida Memory, but were afraid to ask… well here’s your chance!

Jody Norman, Archives Supervisor, and Jon Grandage, Archives Historian, will join host Tom Flanigan for Perspectives (88.9 WFSU-FM) today, October 3, from 11 to 12 PM. During the live call-in show, Jody and Jon will promote special events coming up in October in celebration of Archives Month and discuss what’s new and exciting on Florida Memory and at the State Archives.

Please join us on the air Thursday morning!

Red Barber and Fred Astaire share a microphone, Tallahassee, ca. 1950

Red Barber and Fred Astaire share a microphone, Tallahassee, ca. 1950

October is American Archives Month

Join us for special events at the R.A. Gray building in Tallahassee in celebration of American Archives Month 2013.

2013 Archives Month Poster

On Friday October 11, 2013, visitors will be treated to free food, drinks, and a slideshow in the lobby of the R.A. Gray building. The slideshow will feature images from the Tallahassee Democrat, many unpublished, showing scenes of life in and around Tallahassee from the mid-1950s to the mid-1960s. Refreshments for the slideshow event, which will run from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m., are generously provided by the Friends of the State Library and Archives of Florida.

On Saturday October 12, 2013, the Archives’ Imaging Lab will be open to the public from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Residents of Tallahassee and the surrounding area are encouraged to bring in their original Florida-related family photographs for possible inclusion in the collections of the State Archives of Florida (no digital images please). Many of these images will eventually be made available on the Florida Memory website as part of a special “Big Bend Area” photographic collection.

Both events are free and open to the public and will take place at the R.A. Gray building, 500 S. Bronough St., Tallahassee, FL, 32399.

Email Archives@DOS.MyFlorida.com for more information.

International Coffee Day

September 29th is International Coffee Day! Check out these photos while you enjoy your favorite cup of joe.

Woman enjoying a cup of coffee at Lovett's Food Store, Jacksonville, 1946

Woman enjoying a cup of coffee at Lovett’s Food Store, Jacksonville, 1946

 

Fisherman pouring himself a cup of coffee below deck, Naples, 1949

Fisherman pouring himself a cup of coffee below deck, Naples, 1949

 

Tour guide George Espenlaub making "swamp coffee" in the Everglades, 1950s

Tour guide George Espenlaub making “swamp coffee” in the Everglades, 1950s

 

Maxwell House coffee quality control, Jacksonville, 1950s

Maxwell House coffee quality control, Jacksonville, 1950s

 

Evelyn Horne serving coffee to Billie Parks and Tessie Siegfried at the Riverview Inn restaurant, Estero, ca. 1955

Evelyn Horne serving coffee to Billie Parks and Tessie Siegfried at the Riverview Inn restaurant, Estero, ca. 1955

 

Employee pouring coffee beans into a grinder at the "Oldest Store," St. Augustine, 1964

Employee pouring coffee beans into a grinder at the “Oldest Store,” St. Augustine, 1964

 

American Indian Day

Florida Governor Rick Scott has proclaimed September 27, 2013 American Indian Day.

Addie Billie, Ochopee, 1989

Addie Billie, Ochopee, 1989

Visit Florida Memory to find resources on Native Americans in Florida history.

Online Classroom, The Florida Seminoles

Significant Documents, Land Grant from the Upper Creeks, Lower Creeks and Seminoles to Thomas Brown (March 1, 1783)

Video, “Scenes of the Everglades,” by Homer Augustus Brinkley (1928)

Collections, Theodor de Bry’s 16th Century Engravings of the Timucua Indians

Audio, Interview with Richard Bowers, Seminole Alligator Wrestler

Audio, “Seminole,” written by Will McLean and performed by James Billie (listen below)

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download: MP3

Audio, “Big Alligator,” by James E. Billie (listen below)

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Download: MP3

The items above represent a small sample of resources on Native American history available from the State Library and Archives of Florida.

Jibaro Puertorriqueño

Florida is home to immigrants from across Latin America and the Caribbean. In celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month (September 15-October 15), this series of blog posts features music brought to Florida from throughout the Hispanic world.

Today we’re highlighting Puerto Rican jibaro music. The term jibaro originally referred to Puerto Ricans from the interior mountainous regions of the country. Overtime jibaro became more of a general term for the rural population of Puerto Rico.

Jorge Lopez and Lena Verde performing at the Historical Museum of Southern Florida during the Traditions Festival, Miami, 1986

Jorge Lopez and Lena Verde performing at the Historical Museum of Southern Florida during the Traditions Festival, Miami, 1986

In 1986, Jorge Lopez and the band Lena Verde (Angelo Hernandez, Alejandro Santiago, and Angelo Rosario) performed this traditional style of Puerto Rican music at the first annual South Florida Folk Festival.

La Plena

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.


Download: MP3

More Information: Catalog Record

Special Events at the John G. Riley Museum

In about 1890, John Gilmore Riley (1857-1954) built a family home near the Smokey Hollow neighborhood in Tallahassee. That structure, preserved and rehabilitated beginning in the 1970s through the hard work of several community organizations, is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places and home to the John G. Riley Museum.

John G. Riley, Tallahassee, ca. 1890

John G. Riley, Tallahassee, ca. 1890

Riley served as an educator for nearly 50 years, and as a leader in the African American community throughout his entire life. He took his first teaching job in Wakulla County in 1877 and later became principal of Lincoln Academy.

John G. Riley and Lincoln Academy students, Tallahassee, ca. 1900

John G. Riley and Lincoln Academy students, Tallahassee, ca. 1900

This week, the John G. Riley Museum opens a new visitor center to the public. Special events throughout the week (September 24 – September 28) celebrate the life and legacy of John G. Riley and the history of the Smokey Hollow community.