Letter from Senator David Levy Yulee to Governor William D. Moseley, July 2, 1846, on the progress of the debate on the federal tariff bill of 1846

Series: (Series 2153, Territorial and Early Statehood Records, 1821-1878)

Page 2 of 2

Civil War

Letter from Senator David Levy Yulee to Governor William D. Moseley, July 2, 1846, on the progress of the debate on the federal tariff bill of 1846

Transcript

Senate Chamber
July 27, 46

My Dear Sir,
I enclose you a circular I read just now, and have written Wiley & Putnam that I had referred the subject to your consideration.
We are now near a vote upon the tariff.  Webster has this moment concluded a very long and prosy speech. The universal opinion is that it is the least attractive speech he has ever made here, upon any exciting question.

The issue is extremely doubtful. Haywood has behaved very badly. The Old North State has been dishonored. We are now thrown upon Jarnagin, (a Whig vote) as our only dependence, and today his vote is doubtful. In the course of today the whole matter will be decided. The determination of the Dem. Side of this chamber has been to withhold altogether from speeches. The reason is that oratory is the worst enemy we have to fear, since the day of adjournment has been fixed, and because we think the operation of the bill will on its triumphant vindication against all the Whig arguments.
In haste,
Your friend
D. L. Yulee
His Excellency, Wm. D. Moseley