Greek bagpipe player Nikitas Tsimouris, right, plays the practice chanter, accompanied by his apprentice and grand-nephew Nikitas Kavouklis on the tsabouna - Tarpon Springs, Florida

Greek bagpipe player Nikitas Tsimouris, right, plays the practice chanter, accompanied by his apprentice and grand-nephew Nikitas Kavouklis on the tsabouna - Tarpon Springs, Florida

Credit this photo: State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/108687
(please include photographer's name when noted).

Title

  • Greek bagpipe player Nikitas Tsimouris, right, plays the practice chanter, accompanied by his apprentice and grand-nephew Nikitas Kavouklis on the tsabouna - Tarpon Springs, Florida

Image Number

  • FA2768

Year

  • 1995

Date Note

  • Photographed in January, 1995.

Series Title

General Note

  • Tsimouris learned to play the tsabouna, an ancient Greek bagpipe, while growing up on the island of Kalymnos. He was awarded the National Heritage Fellowship in recognition of his ability to make the goatskin instrument and for his continued performances at social functions in Tarpon Springs.
  • Kavouklis spent almost two years working to develop his skills before applying to the Apprenticeship Program. He wants to learn to play the tsabouna to keep the tradition alive and his goal is to play for weddings, parties, and other community social functions.
  • Today playing the tsabouna, sometimes spelled tsambouna or tzamboura, is a vanishing art, even in Greece. It is believed that the instrument was developed by herdsmen to pass time while tending sheep and goats. Tsabouna music is played in rhythmic patterns unlike the two, three, and four beat music to which most Americans are accustomed. It is dance music and nearly every tune has a song associated with it. Often the lyrics are improvised spontaneously. The repertoire of tunes, playing style and melodic ornamentation vary from one Greek island to the next.

Photographer/Personal Author

Physical Description

  • 1 slide - col.

Subject Term

Geographic Term

Personal Subject

Shelf Number

  • Shelf number: S1640B18BL.

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