Theodor de Bry's Engravings of the Timucua

Theodor de Bry's Engravings of the Timucua

Transcript

Plate XLII
Murder of Pierre Gambre, a Frenchman

We have spoken in our account of a certain Pierre Gambié, a delegate of Laudonnière. In carrying his merchandise across the country to sell it, he had traded so honestly that not only had he enriched himself but he had also married into the family of one of the kings of the region. The king allowed him to leave to pay us a visit on condition that he returned after a certain number of moons. He gave him a canoe and two Indians to accompany him. Thus he embarked with his riches, but his traveling companions slew him while he was poking a fire. They had two motives for this: the first was revenge (Gambié, who during the king's absence was managing his affairs, had killed one of their tribe with a stick); and the second was greed. Having seized the riches stored in the boat, they fled and the deed remained unknown for some time. This picture has been put in at the end so as not to disturb the order of the preceding series. We would not have reproduced it had not the author of the narrative recalled the event.


All transcriptions are taken from Discovering the New World, Based on the Works of Theodore de Bry, edited by Michael Alexander (New York: Harper & Row, 1976).