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Home damaged by Hurricane Dennis: Alligator Point, Florida (July 9, 2005)

Image Number: PR20088

Image by Mark Norman.

Man kayaking with dog on Flagler Avenue by the Salvation Army store: Key West, Florida (2005)

Image Number: DM2664

The flood waters were the result of Hurricane Wilma.

Limerick at the Half Shell Raw Bar during evacuation for Hurricane Ivan: Key West, Florida (Sept 11, 2004)

Image Number: DM1571

Image by Dale M. McDonald.

Limerick #9
Oh no, now we're watchin' for Ivan
The hurricane gods must be jivin'
Charley missed by a hair
Thank God Frances went there
And with luck we'll continue survivin'

Hurricane Ivan's land fall: Fort Walton Beach (2004)

Image Number: PR75892

Image by Chris Duval.

Hurricane Ivan was the strongest hurricane of the 2004 Atlantic hurricane season. It made landfall on the U.S. mainland in Gulf Shores, Alabama on September 16th, as a Category 3.

Damage from Hurricane Ivan: Fort Walton Beach (2004)

Image Number: PR75854

Image by Chris Duval.

Damage from Hurricane Ivan: Fort Walton Beach (2004)

Image Number: PR75876

Image by Chris Duval.

Harold Wilkins walks through rubble left by Hurricane Andrew: Florida City, Florida (1992)

Image Number: N046019

Home destroyed by Hurricane Elena (1985)

Image Number: PR04479

View from the Dupont Plaza during Hurricane Betsy: Miami, Florida (1965)

Image Number: PR04463

Governor Bryant surveying flood damage after Hurricane Dora: Live Oak, Florida (1964)

Image Number: RC06884

Moving slowly through the flooded business district of this North Florida city, Governor Farris Bryant (dark suit center of boat), gets a close look at these business places which had water up to five feet deep in them. It was estimated 18 inches of rain fell over a three day period.

Mortal remains of victims of the 1935 hurricane being cremated: Snake Creek, Florida

Image Number: RC17061

After the big storm, active Army units were assigned to search the shoreline, tidal creeks, and other likely areas where bodies might have been blown or washed up in the final stages of the hurricane.

The boxes being burned are actually makeshift caskets, containing the victims' bodies. Over 350 veterans were thus cremated on the banks of Snake Creek, between Islamorada and Tavernier.

Coffins stacked along the bank of a canal, after the hurricane of 1928: Belle Glade, Florida

Image Number: RC04344

Damage from the 1926 hurricane: Miami, Florida

Image Number: RC05197

Moving slowly through the flooded business district of this North Florida city, Governor Farris Bryant (dark suit center of boat), gets a close look at these business places which had water up to five feet deep in them. It was estimated 18 inches of rain fell over a three day period.

Group of people gathered around building devastated by storm: Cedar Key, Florida (1896)

Image Number: RC03828