Yamato Colony was a farming community in South Florida founded by Japanese immigrant Jo Sakai in 1905. Yamato was the ancient name for Japan. At the time, Japanese immigrants were primarily farmers pushed out of their home country by industrialization and a lack of land. Most settled on the west coast of the United States, but a few ventured east. The community, in the Boca Raton area, grew pineapples and winter vegetables.

Tamotsu (Tom) Kobayashi in army uniform: Yamato, Florida (ca. 1950)

Tamotsu (Tom) Kobayashi in army uniform: Yamato, Florida (ca. 1950)

Image Number: N044913

Last home of H.T. Kamiya: Yamato, Florida (1939)

Last home of H.T. Kamiya: Yamato, Florida (1939)

Image Number: N044921

Kobayashi family portrait (ca.1926)

Kobayashi family portrait (ca.1926)

Image Number: PR13761

L-R: Hideo, Umeko, Theodore, Tomiko.

Last class at Yamato schoolhouse (between 1921 and 1922)

Last class at Yamato schoolhouse (between 1921 and 1922)

Image Number: PR13763

Marjorie Smith and Masa Kamiya: Yamato, Florida (ca. 1921)

Marjorie Smith and Masa Kamiya: Yamato, Florida (ca. 1921)

Image Number: N044919

Kobayashi family having Sunday dinner: Yamato, Florida (ca. 1920)

Kobayashi family having Sunday dinner: Yamato, Florida (ca. 1920)

Image Number: N044915

Rokuo Kamiya holding a box camera: Yamato, Florida (ca. 1920)

Rokuo Kamiya holding a box camera: Yamato, Florida (ca. 1920)

Image Number: N044912

Four boys from Yamato, Florida (ca. 1920)

Four boys from Yamato, Florida (ca. 1920)

Image Number: N044910

L-R: Frank Kamiya, Walter Smith, Rokuo Kamiya, and Harry Smith.

Kazuo and Masuko Kamiya as children: Yamato, Florida (ca. 1920)

Kazuo and Masuko Kamiya as children: Yamato, Florida (ca. 1920)

Image Number: N044909

Kobayashi farm buildings: Yamato, Florida (1920)

Kobayashi farm buildings: Yamato, Florida (1920)

Image Number: N044922

Showing tool shed, out house, storage shed, and mule stable.